Texas Instruments Collection Automobile

Home Search Chip Talk Chip Fun Patents People Pictures Credits Copyright Comments


Summary comments provided by Texas Instruments' staff.


P00221   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.040
 
TI number: P00221
Photo Available Housing, Skid Control Circuit Board - The housing was for the final version of a truck (tractor) skid control circuit board. The design was done in 1973.

The board was mounted in the housing which was mounted on the truck chassis. The project was done for Kelsey-Hayes for use on Ford trucks. It was not put in full production because the Federal requirement for truck skid controls was canceled.

Related material in collection: P00237. Summary comment by: Ralph Dosher, James J. (Jim) Jones.

Z00369   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.049
 
TI number: Z00369
Photo Available Speedometer, Automotive Electronic - This speedometer utilizes a TIL type MIC 2 IC which was developed for this application.

See G00367 and the Artifacts Historical File for additional information. (Written approval of Lucas Swansea must be obtained via TIL Bedford for any displaying of this item).

Related material in collection: G00367-8. Summary comment by: Barry Cooper, Dave Cutler.

Z00024   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.052
 
TI number: Z00024
Photo Available Receiver, Transistorized - This radio was a joint design effort between TI and Delco and represented the first effort to place a fully transistorized radio in automobiles. The concept was a radio that could easily be removed to operate as a portable.

The radio was introduced as an Oldsmobile option. The radio worked well, but it proved to be so easily stolen that it was dropped by GM. Included is the dashboard mounting unit. This work was done in 1957-8.

Summary comment by: Bernie Landress, Roger Webster.

G00368   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.103
 
TI number: G00368
Speedometer, Automotive Electronic - The die on this 100 mm. (4in) slice are for the tachometer/speedometer drive IC, Acc. No. G00367. This was a production slice, and the red dots indicate die rejected at probe test. Die size is 39 x 41mm.

Although the IC is a TIL Bedford design for one of their customers, this slice appears to have been produced in the TID Freising Front End in November, 1983.

Related material in collection: G00367, Z00369. Summary comment by: Barry Cooper, Dave Cutler.

G000367   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.104.01
 
TI number: G000367
Integrated Circuits, Tachometer Driver - This device represented one of TIL's first major automotive engagements. The circuit performs the frequency to voltage conversion required to display the revolutions of a car's engine or drive shaft on an analog voltmeter.

The technology is standard N+bipolar with DUF, epitaxial collector, diffused isolation, diffused base/emitter and aluminum metallization. The device was developed in 1970-1, and production began about 1973. Starting in 1975, 500K units have been shipped annually, with shipments expected to continue into the 1990's. Several other devices having only slight specification variations are available from TIL. See the Artifact Historical File for additional information.

Related material in collection: G00368, Z00369. Summary comment by: Barry Cooper, Dave Cutler.

P00236   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.156
 
TI number: P00236
Photo Available Thermostats, Automotive - These items are two mechanical variations of a thermostat made by Control Products for Ford Motor Company for under the hood overheat and emission controls. These were first produced in the early 1970's.

A Klixon snap-action bimetallic disc is the actuating element.

Summary comment by: Ralph Dosher.

P00236   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.157
 
TI number: P00236
Photo Available Thermostats, Automotive - These items are two mechanical variations of a thermostat made by Control Products for Ford Motor Company for under the hood overheat and emission controls. These were first produced in the early 1970's.

A Klixon snap-action bimetallic disc is the actuating element.

Summary comment by: Ralph Dosher.

P00237   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.252
 
TI number: P00237
Circuit Board, Truck/Tractor Skid Control - The item is an engineering board of the final design for the truck tractor skid control system. The project was for Kelsey-Hayes and was to be used on Ford Trucks. The work was done in early 1973.

This board was used by engineering to check out part of the final design and processing. Hence, it does not represent a finished printed wire board of the final design. A completed board was mounted in a housing (P00221) which was mounted on the truck chassis. Because the Federal requirement for truck skid controls was canceled, the project was not put into production.

Related material in collection: P00221. Summary comment by: Ralph T. Dosher, James J. (Jim) Jones.

P00222   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.259
 
TI number: P00222
Circuit Board, Automotive Skid Control - This board represents the initial version of the circuit board for the Kelsey-Hayes Automotive skid control system. From the device date codes, this board was built in early 1972.

Discrete devices were used in the design which was done by Control Products with Semiconductor Group participation in 1969. The skid control was for use on Ford cars and trucks.

Related material in collection: P00223, P00237. Summary comment by: Raplh Dosher, James J. (Jim) Jones.

P00223   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.260
 
TI number: P00223
Circuit Board, Automotive Skid Control - This board represents the final design of the circuit board for the Kelsey-Hayes automotive skid control system. It was built in February-March, 1973. The skid control was for use in Ford cars.

This design by Control Products with Semiconductor Group participation utilized three integrated circuits. Satisfactory performance of the skid control system was demonstrated, but it was not put into full production. Repeal of the Federal law requiring large trucks to be equipped with such a system deleted the major market requirement and resulted in cancellation of the project. However, some of the top of the line Ford cars were equipped with skid control as an option.

Related material in collection: P00222, P00237. Summary comment by: Ken Buss, Ralph Dosher, James J. (Jim) Jones.

G00313   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.322
 
TI number: G00313
Photo Available Ignition Control Module - This is one of several engineering experimental ignition modules designed and built at TI in 1957 to prove the practicability of a transistorized circuit. These modules received successful road testing in both automobiles and trucks.

In addition to the testing by TI engineers in their personal cars, at least one manufacturer sponsored cross-country truck testing. No failures were reported; performance was improved over that of the conventional system; and wear on the ignition points was negligible. TI did not continue the project because technology limitations at the time made meeting the high voltage and unit cost requirements for the transistors in production impossible. The transistors used were selected early 2N389's. This device type became very widely used and was recognized for its ruggedness. This module was used for several months by Willis Adcock in his personal automobile with good performance. It was removed so as not to confuse the mechanic working on another problem.

Summary comment by: Jim Nygaard, Johnny Ereckson.

G00329   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.329
 
TI number: G00329
Rectifier Display, Automotive Alternator - This display was made about 1956-7 to illustrate possible packaging and mounting for semiconductor rectifiers to be used for automotive alternators. These systems were just being introduced in that time period.

The aluminum plate illustrated how a rectifier could be rolled into the plate. Six units would be mounted on a plate in this manner, and the plate would be mounted on the alternator to provide heat dissipation along with the electrical connection. The copper base plastic unit could be rolled into the plate or solder mounted. The black devices provided a stud mount with a steel cap roll sealed into the top of the package. The gold plated unit used a glass-to-metal seal cap welded to the stud mounted header(base). In 1985-6, this display appears somewhat tentative. But, in 1956-7, the semiconductor industry was just begging to gain knowledge and experience with high current rectifiers, glass-to-metal seals and plastic encapsulation.

Summary comment by: Harry Owens, Bob Wallace.



National Museum of American History


Home Search Chip Talk Chip Fun Patents People Pictures Credits Copyright Comments