Texas Instruments Collection Diode

Home Search Chip Talk Chip Fun Patents People Pictures Credits Copyright Comments


Summary comments provided by Texas Instruments' staff.


G00353   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.082
 
TI number: G00353
Rectifier - This is an example of a silicon rectifier designed in 1952 by TI for the U.S. Air Force. It was to be used as a direct replacement for 5R4 or 5U4 vacuum tubes. The 405 date code indicates it was manufactured in February, 1964.

The rectifier is a full wave 1500V 50mA device with a base to fit the tube socket. On a pin circle having pin 8 missing, pins 1 and 6 are anodes and pin 7 the cathode. The other pins are blank. It contains two diffused junction silicon chips. The steel can was induction soldered to the base. The applicable military specification was MIL E1/1275 USAF.

Summary comment by: Bob Wallace.

G00354   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.083
 
TI number: G00354
Rectifier - This device was built in September, 1961,(date code 136) and was of type used in the nuclear control system on the Polaris submarines. A ceramic disk is used to isolate the device package from the mounting stud.

This device type was manufactured by TI for only one Navy order. The very limited market, with another supplier having the device with a ceramic header did not justify TI continuing to build it.

Summary comment by: Bob Wallace.

G00355   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.084.01
 
TI number: G00355
Rectifier - These devices are early silicon rectifiers built about 1963 for Sandia Corporation for applications requiring nuclear radiation tolerance. This characteristic was achieved by heavily doping the silicon with gold.

Specifications are not available; but Wallace, who worked on the project, remembers it to be approximately a 50 V, 1 A device with high frequency capability. "B8G" was probably a lot identification.

Summary comment by: Bob Wallace, Elmer Wolff.

G00355   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.084.02
 
TI number: G00355
Rectifier - These devices are early silicon rectifiers built about 1963 for Sandia Corporation for applications requiring nuclear radiation tolerance. This characteristic was achieved by heavily doping the silicon with gold.

Specifications are not available; but Wallace, who worked on the project, remembers it to be approximately a 50 V, 1 A device with high frequency capability. "B8G" was probably a lot identification.

Summary comment by: Bob Wallace, Elmer Wolff.

G00356   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.085
 
TI number: G00356
Rectifier - This device is a sectioned example of the first TI epoxy encapsulated silicon rectifier design. The initial packaging work was done in 1955-6.

The process started with round (Cavitron cut) silicon die and silver nail head leads. The die contained a diffused junction, and the leads were attached by means of lead silver eutectic solder. The die area was coated with a silicone varnish and potted in two B stage beads. The assembly was put in a black nylon sleeve and placed in a vacuum oven where the beads flowed under heat to complete the sealing. The project led to the 1N2069, 1N2070, and 1N2071 rectifiers.

Related material in collection: G00357-9. Summary comment by: Obie Draper, Vic Machette, Bob Wallace.

G00357   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.086.01
 
TI number: G00357
Rectifier - These samples represent the second stage of epoxy encapsulation at TI. The work was done in late 1957 and early 1958. An all liquid epoxy was used with a vacuum formed throw-away mold.

The cone shaped end indicated the direction of easy current flow. The silicon die and leads were assembled as described for G00356. See G00358 for additional assembly details. The symbolization TIE7C indicates these devices were from an engineering evaluation lot identified as Group 7C.

Related material in collection: G00356, 8 & 9. Summary comment by: Obie Draper, Vic Machette, Bob Wallace.

G00357   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.086.02
 
TI number: G00357
Rectifier - These samples represent the second stage of epoxy encapsulation at TI. The work was done in late 1957 and early 1958. An all liquid epoxy was used with a vacuum formed throw-away mold.

The cone shaped end indicated the direction of easy current flow. The silicon die and leads were assembled as described for G00356. See G00358 for additional assembly details. The symbolization TIE7C indicates these devices were from an engineering evaluation lot identified as Group 7C.

Related material in collection: G00356, 8 & 9. Summary comment by: Obie Draper, Vic Machette, Bob Wallace.

G00358   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.087.01
 
TI number: G00358
Rectifier - This item contains epoxy encapsulated silicon rectifiers which have been sectioned to show the internal construction. These are examples of the rectifiers described in G00357.

As part of this product improvement, serrations were added to the leads to improve the device lead pull strength. Also, the die area was coated with alumina filled silastic to increase head dissipation and reduce the stresses caused by the molding compound.

Related material in collection: G00356, 7 & 9. Summary comment by: Obie Draper, Vic Machette, Bob Wallace.

G00358   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.087.02
 
TI number: G00358
Rectifier - This item contains epoxy encapsulated silicon rectifiers which have been sectioned to show the internal construction. These are examples of the rectifiers described in G00357.

As part of this product improvement, serrations were added to the leads to improve the device lead pull strength. Also, the die area was coated with alumina filled silastic to increase head dissipation and reduce the stresses caused by the molding compound.

Related material in collection: G00356, 7 & 9. Summary comment by: Obie Draper, Vic Machette, Bob Wallace.

G00359   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.088
 
TI number: G00359
Rectifier - This item is a TI prototype epoxy encapsulated silicon rectifier from the early 1960's. It represents another step in the evolution of epoxy encapsulation of silicon rectifiers at Texas Instruments.

Gold plated serrated kovar leads replaced the silver leads for cost reduction. A woven fiberglass sleeve was coated with silicone varnish and slipped over the rectifier prior to the transfer molding operation to relieve the mismatch stress caused by the epoxy. Improvements in processing resulted in the introduction of the 1N4001-7 in late 1964 or early 1965 to super cede the 1N2069-71; and, by the late 1960's, a smaller molded package was introduced.

Related material in collection: G00356-8. Summary comment by: Obie Draper, Vic Machette, Bob Wallace.

G00360   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.089
 
TI number: G00360
Rectifier - This device is from an engineering lot of the first TI SCR design. It used an aluminum alloy gate and was produced in the 1957-8 period. The design used a diffused junction with the gate formed by alloying aluminum through the junction.

This development led to a board line of SCR's or thyristors by TI for consumer, industrial and military applications. By the early 1980's, the market was considerably reduced by the control circuit changes brought on by IC's. In 1986, the only types manufactured by TI are for radiation hardened requirements.

Summary comment by: Ed Allison, Wade Feemster, Dave Jasper.

G00364   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.093
 
TI number: G00364
Diode, Microwave - This diode is a gallium arsenide microwave mixer diode designed and built at TI about 1964 for KU band operation. It is an example of the earliest available semiconductor microwave devices.

With the improvements in silicon materials technology, this device type was changed to silicon in 1967 for cost reduction.

Summary comment by: Bernie Landress, Curtis Randolph.

G00351   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.177.01
 
TI number: G00351
Rectifier Module, Silicon High Voltage - This module from the 1958-60 period consisted of a string of TI diodes of the 1N645 series (probably 1N649's) with current balancing resistors connected to achieve a breakdown voltage of 5,000 V.

Modules of this sort were a means of achieving voltage and current levels greater than possible in a single device with the then state-of-the-art.

Related material in collection: G00060. Summary comment by: Elmer Elkins, Bob Wallace.

G00351   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.177.02
 
TI number: G00351
Rectifier Module, Silicon High Voltage - This module from the 1958-60 period consisted of a string of TI diodes of the 1N645 series (probably 1N649's) with current balancing resistors connected to achieve a breakdown voltage of 5,000 V.

Modules of this sort were a means of achieving voltage and current levels greater than possible in a single device with the then state-of-the-art.

Related material in collection: G00060. Summary comment by: Elmer Elkins, Bob Wallace.

G00351   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.177.03
 
TI number: G00351
Rectifier Module, Silicon High Voltage - This module from the 1958-60 period consisted of a string of TI diodes of the 1N645 series (probably 1N649's) with current balancing resistors connected to achieve a breakdown voltage of 5,000 V.

Modules of this sort were a means of achieving voltage and current levels greater than possible in a single device with the then state-of-the-art.

Related material in collection: G00060. Summary comment by: Elmer Elkins, Bob Wallace.

G00179   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.184.01
 
TI number: G00179
Diodes - These are the 3rd and 4th diodes produced by TI Deutschland at their start of diode production in April, 1966.

Startup date provided 5/15/85 by Maria Young in Dallas ESG office.

G00179   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.184.02
 
TI number: G00179
Diodes - These are the 3rd and 4th diodes produced by TI Deutschland at their start of diode production in April, 1966.

Startup date provided 5/15/85 by Maria Young in Dallas ESG office.

G00172   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.186
 
TI number: G00172
Diode stacks display - Display is an example of a product line produced at TI in the late 1950's and early 1960's. Each device consists of a series of TI silicon diodes connected in a stack and molded into a single package to get high peak inverse voltage.

Summary comment by: Elmer Elkins.

G00254   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.208
 
TI number: G00254
Diode, Light Emitting - This item is a TI emitting diode. Type number and date of manufacture are not known.

From the date codes on other items included in the lot with this one, the production date is probably about 1976.

Summary comment by: Hal Camp.

G00256   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.210
 
TI number: G00256
Diode, Double Plug Silicon - The item is a production example of the TI glass double-plug silicon diode.

This is a 1N251 (date code 7533). Instead of the TI trademark, it is marked only with GOJ, the military designator for TI, because of space. This design was in production from 1962 until the second quarter of 1982 when the diode operation transfer to Unitrode was completed. The production volume was approximately 50 million units per month in 1982.

Related material in collection: G00195. Summary comment by: Obie Draper.

G00188   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.215.01
 
TI number: G00188
Diode - Items are samples of the Micro G diode which was the smallest production diode available at that time. They were in production in 1961-3.

See G00178 for additional information.

Related material in collection: G00178. Summary comment by: Obie Draper.

G00188   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.215.02
 
TI number: G00188
Diode - Items are samples of the Micro G diode which was the smallest production diode available at that time. They were in production in 1961-3.

See G00178 for additional information.

Related material in collection: G00178. Summary comment by: Obie Draper.

G00119   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.240
 
TI number: G00119
Array, Diode-Integrated Circuit - This item, made in early 1977 contains a diode array and two IC's mounted on a ceramic substrate. It was part of an optical reader, but the customer and specific use are not known.

Summary comment by: John Gibson, Don Hyde.

G00352   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.288
 
TI number: G00352
Rectifier Module, Silicon High Voltage - This module was designed under a U.S. Navy contract to be a replacement for an 866 high voltage mercury rectifier being used in shipboard fire control equipment for large guns. It was molded on a standard vacuum tube base. The work was done in 1956-7.

The specification were 4 kV and 1 A ac. The contract requirements were met, but no production developed.

Summary comment by: Bob Wallace.

G00329   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.329
 
TI number: G00329
Rectifier Display, Automotive Alternator - This display was made about 1956-7 to illustrate possible packaging and mounting for semiconductor rectifiers to be used for automotive alternators. These systems were just being introduced in that time period.

The aluminum plate illustrated how a rectifier could be rolled into the plate. Six units would be mounted on a plate in this manner, and the plate would be mounted on the alternator to provide heat dissipation along with the electrical connection. The copper base plastic unit could be rolled into the plate or solder mounted. The black devices provided a stud mount with a steel cap roll sealed into the top of the package. The gold plated unit used a glass-to-metal seal cap welded to the stud mounted header(base). In 1985-6, this display appears somewhat tentative. But, in 1956-7, the semiconductor industry was just begging to gain knowledge and experience with high current rectifiers, glass-to-metal seals and plastic encapsulation.

Summary comment by: Harry Owens, Bob Wallace.

G00178   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.348
 
TI number: G00178
Diode display - Display contains two diodes and was used for advertising the Micro G as the world's smallest diode.

The Micro G diode went into production in 1961 and was in production for two plus years. Although TI solved the problems of handling this very small item, the customers also had handling problems; and for many of them at the time, the space savings did not justify the additional handling problems.

Related material in collection: G00188. Summary comment by: Obie Draper.



National Museum of American History


Home Search Chip Talk Chip Fun Patents People Pictures Credits Copyright Comments