Texas Instruments Collection Radar

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Summary comments provided by Texas Instruments' staff.


Y00384   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.061
 
TI number: Y00384
Radar Module - This module represents the first demonstration of fully functional monolithic radar transmit/receive modules with acceptable yields. The significance of this development was recognized by DARPA with its 1985 award for Outstanding Contractor Breakthrough made to TI.

This development was a result of a five year program at TI sponsored by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories, Avionics. DARPA stated that this key accomplishment demonstrated that T/R modules should be manufacturable at low costs commensurate with the requirements of future large active aperture phased array and ECM systems. The research program is to continue with the goal of quantity production in the 1990's. The 13.0 mm x 4.5 mm Ga/Aa chip includes 25 FET's, 24 ion implanted resistors, 43 capacitors, 48 vias and electron beam lithography defined submicron gates. The chip incorporates a 1/2 watt power amplifier, a low noise amplifier, a 4-bit phase shifter and t/R switches. This item, submitted by CRL as a most significant development of 1985, was the result of joint effort by CRL and DSEG. See the Artifact Historical File for additional information.

G00430   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.167
 
TI number: G00430
Radar Module, Radio Frequency - This RF module (out of spec) is typical of the 604 modules used in the MERA array. The Molecular Electronics for Radar Applications (MERA) program at TI resulted in a solid-state phased array radar.

The MERA program covering the radar development and delivery of an array was done at TI from late 1964 to mid 1968 under contract with the Air Force AFAL, followed by a contract for an extensive testing program lasting over a year. For additional details and information, see Related Material and the Artifacts Historical Files.

Related material in collection: G00100, C00431, PC00100, 101, 102. Summary comment by: Brad LaGrange, John Wassel.

C00431   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.168
 
TI number: C00431
Radar Module, Radio Frequency - This item is a MERA array RF module with the lids removed to show the circuitry. See C00430 for a description of the module and the MERA program.

Related material in collection: G00100, C00430, PC00100, 101, 102. Summary comment by: Brad LaGrange, John Wassel.

G00100   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.194
 
TI number: G00100
Radar Module Display - Begun in 1965, MERA (molecular electronics for radar applications) eliminated moving parts and increased sweep speed to .001 second by use of phased transmit/receive arrays.

This item was part of the original S/B Lobby display. Shown is a photo of the first MERA array, the two ceramic circuit boards of each module and a schematic of the functions contained on the boards. There were 604 modules in the first MERA array which was completed in June, 1968. The two substrates shown, which do not contain the full complement of chips were mounted on opposite sides of the MERA module. Except for the power transistor, all the transistors, diodes and capacitors were beam lead chips. For additional information, see "Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits: An Historical Perspective", IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES. Vol. MTT - 32, No. 9, September, 1984. A copy is in the Artifacts Historical file.

Related material in collection: G00101-2, 180, 310, 311. Summary comment by: Tom Hyltin, Brad LaGrange, Frank Opp, Roger Webster.

G00102   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.281
 
TI number: G00102
Components, Radar Application - The X-band mixer on high P silicon and the surface-oriented switching diode were developed for the MERA module but technical problems prevented their being used in the development modules. Hybrid circuit alternates were used instead.

This item was part of the original S/B Lobby display. The X-band mixer is on the left and the switching diode on the right. The diode chip has been broken in past handling. For additional information, see "Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits: An Historical Perspective", IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, Vol. MTT-32, No. 9, September, 1984, in the Artifact Historical Files.

Related material in collection: G00100, 101, 180, 310, 311. Summary comment by: Tom Hyltin, Brad LaGrange, Frank Opp, Roger Webster.



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