Texas Instruments Collection Radio

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Summary comments provided by Texas Instruments' staff.


G00083   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.003
 
TI number: G00083
Photo Available Receiver, Transistorized - 1954-55 - One of the first transistorized radios following Regency. It was designed and built with TI devices in Engineering to demonstrate feasibility in 1954-55.

This item was part of the original S/B Lobby display. This radio was shown to potential customers to promote the idea of a small transistorized portable radio.

Related material in collection: G00084, 85, 106. Summary comment by: Jim Nygaard, Roger Webster.

G00085   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.046
 
TI number: G00085
Photo Available Receiver, Transistorized - This radio was built with experimental glass encapsulated transistors in 1957-8 for demonstration to potential semiconductor customers.

This item was part of the original S/B Lobby display. Glass encapsulation was considered as a potential cost reduction over the glass and metal package. However, the process lost out to plastic for a low cost process.

Summary comment by: Jim Nygaard, Roger Webster.

Z00024   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.052
 
TI number: Z00024
Photo Available Receiver, Transistorized - This radio was a joint design effort between TI and Delco and represented the first effort to place a fully transistorized radio in automobiles. The concept was a radio that could easily be removed to operate as a portable.

The radio was introduced as an Oldsmobile option. The radio worked well, but it proved to be so easily stolen that it was dropped by GM. Included is the dashboard mounting unit. This work was done in 1957-8.

Summary comment by: Bernie Landress, Roger Webster.

G00084   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.075
 
TI number: G00084
Photo Available Receiver, Transistorized - This was the first transistorized auto radio built at TI. It was built in Engineering using TI devices as a prototype to demonstrate feasibility to Delco for use in GM cars. Work was done in 1955.

This item was part of the original S/B Lobby display. The dash mounted radio and the speaker were included in the same case for convenience in carrying.

Related material in collection: Z00024. Summary comment by: Roger Webster.

Z00341   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.078
 
TI number: Z00341
Receiver, Transistorized - This radio was designed and built around a TI eight transistor kit in 1957. Although labeled as a pocket radio by Emerson, it was larger than usual for that designation. The design utilized eight transistors for improved performance.

At the time of the design of this radio, the usual procedure was to design for the minimum number of transistors to keep component costs low. However, it was found that the specifications for four of the transistors could be relaxed enough to improve yields considerably. As a result, the eight transistor kit cost only slightly more than the conventional four or six transistor kits.

Summary comment by: Jim Lineback, Jim Nygaard.

Z00411   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.131
 
TI number: Z00411
Receiver, Transistorized - This radio is an early production model, S/N 11520, of the Regency pocket radio. From the serial number and the type of symbolization on the transistors, the radio was built no later than early in the first quarter of 1955.

See Related Material and the Artifact Historical Files for additional information.

Related material in collection: G00107, Z00108, 109, 409. Summary comment by: Boyd Cornelison, Paul Davis, S.T. Harris, Jim Nygaard, Roger Webster.

G00430   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.167
 
TI number: G00430
Radar Module, Radio Frequency - This RF module (out of spec) is typical of the 604 modules used in the MERA array. The Molecular Electronics for Radar Applications (MERA) program at TI resulted in a solid-state phased array radar.

The MERA program covering the radar development and delivery of an array was done at TI from late 1964 to mid 1968 under contract with the Air Force AFAL, followed by a contract for an extensive testing program lasting over a year. For additional details and information, see Related Material and the Artifacts Historical Files.

Related material in collection: G00100, C00431, PC00100, 101, 102. Summary comment by: Brad LaGrange, John Wassel.

C00431   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.168
 
TI number: C00431
Radar Module, Radio Frequency - This item is a MERA array RF module with the lids removed to show the circuitry. See C00430 for a description of the module and the MERA program.

Related material in collection: G00100, C00430, PC00100, 101, 102. Summary comment by: Brad LaGrange, John Wassel.

G00107   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.265
 
TI number: G00107
Photo Available Receiver, Transistorized - The item is one of the first engineering prototypes built in 1954. The Plexiglass case was representative of the final case for which tooling was in concurrent design and fabrication.

The item was part of the original S/B Lobby display and the 50th Anniversary exhibit. The radio was a joint TI/IDEA(Regency) effort, with TI being responsible for the device and circuit design. TI originated the idea for such a radio and recruited Regency's participation for their production and marketing capabilities. For additional information see "The secret six-month project" IEEE SPECTRUM, December, 1985, and TR-1 Technical Data and Service Notes. Copies are in the Artifact Historical File.

Related material in collection: Z00108, Z00109. Summary comment by: Boyd Cornelison, Paul Davis, S. T. Harris, Jim Nygaard, Roger Webster.

Z00108   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.266
 
TI number: Z00108
Photo Available Receiver, Transistorized - This radio, S/N 14528, is an early production model. The initial production radio had S/N 1001. (See Z00409.) Some of the early radios were put in clear cases for demonstration purposes.

The item was part of the original S/B Lobby display and the 50th Anniversary exhibit. See Related Material for additional information.

Related material in collection: G00107, Z00109, 409, 411. Summary comment by: Boyd Cornelison, Paul Davis, S. T. Harris, Jim Nygaard, Roger Webster.

G00106   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.267
 
TI number: G00106
Photo Available Receiver, Transistorized - The radio is a 1957 redesigned version of one of the first transistorized table radios. It was built to demonstrate to radio manufacturers. It also used TI built transformers.

This item was part of the original S/B Lobby display.

Summary comment by: Roger Webster.

Z00139   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.277
 
TI number: Z00139
Receiver, transistorized - This radio was introduced in mid 1958 @ $29.95. It represented the first major sale of a TI reflex 4 germanium transistor kit.

The advantage of the reflex transistor kit was that it permitted the production of a small portable radio with longer battery life. For a TI news item on this radio and kit, see the Artifact Historical File.

Summary comment by: Jim Naygaard, Hank Stewart and Roger Webster.

G00314   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.323
 
TI number: G00314
Transmitter, Transistorized Radio - This transmitter was designed and built in late 1953 in the engineering model shop using TI germanium grown junction transistors. It was the first such product done at TI. It was built for and used in the ceremonies opening the enlarged Lemmon Avenue Plant on November 18, 1953.

The transmitter, built under the guidance of Don Retzlaff with Al Fox a member of the team, produced a voice actuated signal. The unit, less the battery, was in a small case with a strap to resemble a wrist watch. The antenna was wrapped around the case, and the battery was carried separately by the wearer and wired to the case. A conventional receiver several feet away picked up the signal and actuated a spark which cut the ribbon for the official opening. The batter with the transmitter is the original one. The case and antenna are lost. See Photographs PZ00086 & 7 for the event in which the transmitter was used. The November, 1953, issue of "texins" contains a brief account of the opening.

Related material in collection: PZ00085, 6. Summary comment by: Al Fox, S. T. Harris.

Z00304   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.327
 
TI number: Z00304
Receiver, Transistorized - This radio is an example of the mass produced low priced pocket radios resulting from the introduction of the TI designed Regency radio introduced in late 1954.

This radio was assembled in Hong Kong, probably in late 1962. It has six TI germanium transistors with date codes of 239, indicating manufacture in the 39th week of 1962.

C00417   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.357
 
TI number: C00417
Photo Available Receiver, Microprocessor Controlled - The TI 9000 Loran C receiver, announced in August, 1977, was the first low cost receiver designed for small boats and for use by the novice as well as the veteran skipper. This unit, S/N 9A0662 was the 162nd production set.

The TI 9000 was microprocessor computer controlled to rapidly and automatically search, acquire and track available stations to obtain and display up to four time differences. Several configurations and circuit updates of the 9000 were built, including the TI 9900 series which provided voice information for certain programmed functions. A line of airborne receivers, TI 9100, TI 91 and TI 92 were also built, starting with the TI 9100 in early 1982. TI halted production of the Loran receivers in the first quarter of 1986 because of unprofitability. The line had become a mature technology with high assembly costs. Subcontracted assembly in Mexico could not match the Far East competition. For additional information, see the Artifacts Historical Files.

Summary comment by: Ed Beaver, James A. Cook, Jerry Setliff.

G00086   NMAH Catalog Number 1987.0487.358
 
TI number: G00086
Photo Available Receiver, Transistorized - This was the first television receiver using all semiconductors built at TI (1958) and was probably one of the first built anywhere. The set was built to demonstrate feasibility to potential semiconductor customers.

This item was part of the original S/B Lobby display. The major technical problem at the time was making a low cost high voltage rectifier.

Summary comment by: Jim Nygaard, Roger Webster.



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